How microlens arrays help measure the color of oceans

Wie Mikrolinsen-Arrays helfen, die Farbe der Ozeane zu messen

Case Study

As part of NASA’s PACE project, a spectrometer in orbit will measure the "color of the ocean” – the intensity distribution of light in several closely spaced wavelength ranges with unprecedented spectral resolution.

Im PACE-Projekt der NASA wird ein Spektrometer aus dem Orbit die „Farbe der Ozeane“ – die Intensitätsverteilung des Lichtes in mehreren, eng beieinanderliegenden Wellenlängenbereichen – mit bisher nicht gekannter spektraler Auflösung messen.

read more

Authors: Luis A. Ramos-Izquierdo (Optical Systems Engineer), NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, USA, Alejandro Perez Rodriguez (Optical Engineer), SGT Inc., Greenbelt, MD, USA
Dr. Stefan Hambücker (Managing Director), Dr. Chhavi Jain (Product Development Engineer), INGENERIC GmbH, Aachen, Germany

As part of NASA’s PACE project, a spectrometer in orbit will measure the "color of the ocean” – the intensity distribution of light in several closely spaced wavelength ranges with unprecedented spectral resolution. An important component of this is a microlens array from INGENERIC, which couples the received light in the short-wave infrared with high efficiency into a glass fiber bundle.

As part of the PACE (Plankton, Aerosol, Cloud, ocean Ecosystem) mission, NASA is planning to measure the "color of the oceans" from a satellite scheduled to launch in 2022. The mission will help scientists investigate microscopic ocean organisms that play a significant role in feeding marine life, aerosols, and clouds – and the role all of these play in the Earth system.

OCI – Ocean Color Instrument

The central instrument of the PACE Satellite is a highly advanced optical spectrometer called the Ocean Color Instrument (OCI), that measures properties of light from ocean environments over portions of the electromagnetic spectrum from ultraviolet to short-wavelength Infrared (SWIR). A schematic showing the planned layout and principle of OCI can be seen in Fig. 1(i) and 1(ii) respectively.

Its advantage to previous NASA satellite sensors is its hyperspectral capability, i.e. improved spectral resolution of 5 nm when measuring the spectral range between 350-885 nm and large signal to noise ratios (SNRs). Moreover, to retrieve accurate ocean optical properties, OCI can remove unwanted reflectance contributions from the atmosphere (e.g. aerosol reflectance) and ocean surface. This atmospheric correction especially for near-shore regions or turbid waters is performed in the SWIR range where water absorption is few orders of magnitude greater than in the near infrared, ensuring nearly zero ocean reflectance.

The PACE Team at the Goddard Space Flight Center is currently developing the system to meet performance standards from scientists studying the atmosphere, ocean and even land surface.

The planned satellite will orbit around earths northern-southern hemispheres at an altitude of 675 km and consists of a cross-track rotating telescope that makes 360 rotations per minute and has a field of view of ± 56.5 °. For every instance in time, the telescope records an array of 1 x 16 spatial pixels also called “science pixels” by NASA where each pixel amounts to a 1 x 1 km geographical area measured at Nadir. Furthermore, to ensure high SNRs by building enough signal for integration, the telescope views the same geographical scene on earth for an extended time by imaging every “science pixel” 16 times, as it rotates.

This broadband light signal from oceans (acquired in the form of 16 spatial pixels) is reflected off a primary mirror (an off-axis parabola), depolarized and projected onto a rectangular slit. Thereafter, it is collimated and redirected using dichroic beam splitters to blue and red hyperspectral channels where dispersive gratings separate the individual wavelengths respectively and image them on time delay integration-charged coupled devices (TDI-CCDs). The SWIR bands are analyzed using a remotely located multi-band filter spectrograph that contains a temperature cooled 1 x 16 detector array. To couple light into the detector array, a 1 x 16 bundle of 600 µm core sized multi-mode fiber (MMF) with a numerical aperture of 0.22 is used. This is a superior approach than using 16 individual lens systems to couple incoming light from telescope to the detector array where precise mechanical alignment is cumbersome and prone to errors.

For efficient coupling of collimated light into the MMFs, NASA decided to use aspherical microlens arrays (MLA) with the requirement of low coupling losses. To minimize polarization dependent losses, both the MMFs and the MLAs required broadband anti-reflection coating from 0.9 to 2.3 µm. The goal is to be able to couple light over the entire spectrum with an efficiency of 95 percent.

The selection process

For the initial testing phase, NASA obtained commercially available lithographically produced quartz MLA with a pitch (lens center-to-center distance) of 1.3 mm. To determine the performance of the MLA, the surface profile of individual lenses was measured and compared with the desired lens surface profile where considerable deviations in surface sag profile at the lens edges of the lithographic lens were found (Fig. 2 (i)). During optical simulations with commercial software Zemax, the measured surface sag errors at edges showed an increase in the spherical aberration at the image plane, which has the consequence of decreased coupling efficiency into fibers.

Moreover, in the case of an array of aspherical microlenses, deviations of surface sag especially at the microlens edges can lead to the formation of dead transition zones (flat and shallow interfaces) between consecutive lenslets as shown in Fig.2 (iii). These dead zones were characterized using a laboratory bench-top imaging setup by NASA whose layout can be seen in Fig. 3(i). Using this setup, white light that passed through a rectangular slit located at the focal plane of the telescope was collimated, and redirected to illuminate the MLA. The MLA generated 16 round images of the telescope exit pupil, which were imaged using a telecentric lens on a SWIR camera. The resulting images showed leakage of ‘stray’ light from interfacial areas between the lenslets shown in part (a) of Fig. 3(ii) and can be attributed to presence of optical aberrations. In aspherical MLAs, the presence of spherical aberrations and transition zones has the consequence of reduced optical coupling efficiency of light into optical fibers.

In search of MLA where the coupling efficiency could be improved, NASA decided to test MLAs fabricated using a precision molding technique. For the second design phase, NASA tested aspherical MLAs from INGENERIC (Fig. 4) with a pitch of 1.5 mm. For this test phase, NASA increased both the lens radius of curvature and array pitch to compensate for changes in instrument layout.

At the beginning of the project, to ensure that the quality of the glass and coating meet the requirements, INGENERIC provided NASA with plane glass samples with a special anti-reflection coating optimized for the entire spectrum from 0.9 to 2.3 µm. Subsequent tests confirmed that the transmissivity requirements were met.

The next step was to test the accuracy of surface form of produced MLAs and their imaging properties. Using a commercial areal confocal 3D measurement setup (NanoFocus µsurf), the surface profile of the MLA was measured by INGENERIC and compared to the design requirements by NASA. As shown in Fig. 2(ii) a comparison of the two profiles showed an excellent agreement between the design requirements of NASA and the INGENERIC manufactured lens profile. This resulted in the INGENERIC produced MLAs to have transition zones that were almost an order of magnitude smaller than the MLAs produced by lithographic methods! Furthermore, pitch analysis of the INGENERIC MLA showed an exceptional accuracy with pitch errors <1 µm.

Furthermore, using the qualitative laboratory bench-top imaging test, NASA observed a considerable decrease in the ‘light leakage’ areas from the MLA interface (part (b) of Fig. 3(ii)), which again shows a qualitative improvement in the performance of the MLAs. While the previously used etched MLAs from other manufacturers did not meet NASA's requirements, INGENERIC's MLAs significantly exceeded the original expectations.

Both project partners attribute the superior performance of INGENERIC's MLAs to the manufacturing process: Precision molding of aspherical microlenses that enables the design specifications for the shape of the lenses to be met with the highest precision. In this way, the lenses achieve optimum image quality. This is especially true for the edges of neighboring microlenses when coupling into glass fibers: If they are not manufactured precisely, light is scattered into the transition zones between the fibers and cannot be used for coupling. Here, too, the MLAs from INGENERIC perform impressively.

The current project status

The OCI will be built at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt in the American state of Maryland. Laboratory tests are currently being carried out at component level (breadboard) to optimize the mechanical adjustment of the fiber bundles. The next steps will be the connection to the telescope and the examination of the entire optical path from the exit of the telescope to the entrance of the fibers. Integration into the Engineering Test Unit is planned for the summer of 2019. The satellite is expected to enter orbit in 2022.

Summary

During the development of the “Ocean Color Instrument” OCI for NASA's PACE project, microlens arrays from INGENERIC, which the company manufactures using the precision molding process, proved to be far superior to etched arrays: They exceed the original requirements of the customer and will thus contribute to a significantly increased efficiency of coupling the light from the ocean surface into glass fibers of the satellite’s optical system.

1,400 words including introduction

Precision moldings (Info-box)

INGENERIC works with precision molding techniques, which ensure that high refractive index glass takes on precisely the form of the molding tool. The molds manufactured by the company to sub-micron precision enable the arrays to be produced with exceptionally high accuracy and reproducibility. INGENERIC successfully manufactures arrays with minimal transition zones, highest filling factors and minimal pitch errors, even in large batches.

When it comes to designing micro-optics for special applications, the process offers significant degrees of freedom: Compared to the etching process, optics can be far more complex with a larger radius-to-aperture aspect ratio. Furthermore, the process excels with a relative radius tolerance better than 0.2 percent, which is fully reproducible in serial production.

The array structures typically have dimensions in the sub-millimeter range, and the form accuracy is sub-micrometer at less than P.V. 250 nm. Another advantage is the small transition zone between the lenslets which is typical less than 10 µm. This makes it possible to produce arrays with high fill factors and to make the best possible use of the optically effective surface area. The benefit to the user: Optimal beam shaping and high-efficiency transmission.

Especially for micro-lens arrays for some applications the pitch accuracy is very important. INGENERIC is able to offer also a very high precision: INGENERIC reproduces the separation between the individual lens center points with an accuracy of better than 2 μm over a length of 25 mm, so there is no accumulation of errors across the width of the array.

For some micro-optics- particularly the two-sided structures—the exact adherence to the central thickness is vitally important, since they have a telescopic effect and the slightest deviations lead to aberrations. INGENERIC achieves accuracies in the μm range here.

INGENERIC manufactures microlens arrays with aspherical or spherical lenses that are planoconvex, biconvex or convex-concave, and which have a circular, rectangular or hexagonal aperture.

310 words

About INGENERIC

Founded in 2001 in the university-city of Aachen, Germany, INGENERIC GmbH develops and manufactures high-precision micro-optic components for high-power applications, along with optical and laser systems including fiber couplers, homogenizers and collimation modules for science, medicine and measurement technology.

Today, INGENERIC is one of the few manufacturers in Europe to develop and manufacture glass micro-optics for beam shaping in semiconductor diode lasers according to the individual specifications of its international customers. The company handles the entire process chain from the lens design and the development of prototypes through to the small-batch production and serial manufacture.

Illustrations

Figure 1:   (i) Schematic of the planned Ocean Color Instrument (OCI) showing different sub-systems.
(Picture source: NASA, 2018)
(ii) Schematic of the working principle of the OCI (CCD: CCD sensor; SWIR: short wavelength infrared; MLA: microlens array; MMF: multimode fiber)

File name:
INGENERIC OCI_NASA.png

 

Figure 2:   (i) Comparison of the measured sag profile of lithographic lens with prescribed lens for lens aperture diameter of 1.3 mm
(ii) Comparison of the measured sag profile of INGENERIC lens with prescribed design for aperture diameter of 1.5 mm
(iii) plot showing a qualitative description and comparison of dead transition zone formation between consecutive lenslets in lithographic and INGENERIC MLA

File name:
INGENERIC Profile comparison.png

 

Figure 3:   (i) Schematic of the benchtop imaging setup used for qualitative analysis of the MLA
(ii) Camera image showing round profile of images generated by two consecutive lenslets in a (a) lithographic MLA and (b) INGENERIC MLA under uniform white light illumination

File name:
INGENERIC NASA_MLA-characterization setup.png

 

Figure 4:   The microlens array for the NASA PACE mission produced by INGENERIC using the precision molding process.

File name::
INGENERIC_JB83199.jpg

 

Image credits: fig. 1, 2 (i), 3: NASA; fig. 2 (ii), 2 (iii), 4: INGENERIC GmbH

weiterlesen

Wie Mikrolinsen-Arrays helfen, die Farbe der Ozeane zu messen

Autoren:         Luis A. Ramos-Izquierdo, Optical Systems Engineer, Alejandro Perez Rodriguez, Optical Engineer, beide Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, USA
Dr. Stefan Hambücker, Geschäftsführer, Dr. Chhavi Jain, Product Development Engineer, beide INGENERIC GmbH, Aachen, Deutschland

Vorspann

Im PACE-Projekt der NASA wird ein Spektrometer aus dem Orbit die „Farbe der Ozeane“ – die Intensitätsverteilung des Lichtes in mehreren, eng beieinanderliegenden Wellenlängenbereichen – mit bisher nicht gekannter spektraler Auflösung messen. Eine wichtige Komponente ist ein Mikrolinsen-Array von INGENERIC, das das empfangene Licht im kurzwelligen Infrarot mit hoher Effizienz in ein Glasfaserbündel einkoppelt.

Fließtext

Mit der PACE (Plankton, Aerosol, Cloud, ocean Ecosystem) Mission plant die NASA, die „Farbe der Ozeane“ von einem Satelliten aus zu messen, der im Jahr 2022 starten soll. Die Mission wird Wissenschaftlern dabei helfen, mikroskopisch kleine Organismen in den Weltmeeren zu untersuchen, die eine wichtige Rolle in der marinen Nahrungskette sowie bei der Entstehung von Aerosolen und Wolken spielen. Dabei soll auch ermittelt werden, welche Bedeutung all diese Komponenten für das Gesamtsystem der Erde haben.

OCI – Ocean Color Instrument

Das zentrale Instrument des PACE-Satelliten ist ein hochmodernes optisches Spektrometer mit dem Namen Ocean Color Instrument (OCI), das die Eigenschaften des von der Oberfläche der Ozeane empfangenen Lichts über das elektromagnetische Spektrum vom Ultraviolett bis zum kurzwelligen Infrarot (SWIR) misst. Der geplante Aufbau und das Funktionsprinzip des OCI sind in den Abbildungen 1 (i) und 1 (ii) dargestellt.

Der Vorteil gegenüber vorherigen NASA-Satellitensensoren liegt in der Fähigkeit des OCI, „hyperspektral“ – also im Wellenlängenbereich zwischen 350 und 885 nm – mit einer verbesserten Auflösung von 5 nm sowie einem großen Signal-Rausch-Verhältnis zu messen. Um die exakten optischen Eigenschaften des Ozeans zu ermitteln, kann das OCI außerdem unerwünschte, aus der Atmosphäre (z. B. von Aerosolen) oder von der Meeresoberfläche stammende Reflexionen ausfiltern. Diese atmosphärische Korrektur erfolgt vor allem in der Nähe von Küsten oder über trübem Wasser im SWIR-Bereich, in dem die Wasserabsorption mehrere Größenordnungen größer ist als im nahen Infrarot. So wird der Einfluss der Reflexion auf nahezu Null reduziert.

Das PACE Team am Goddard Space Flight Center entwickelt das System zurzeit den Leistungsanforderungen der Wissenschaftler entsprechend, die die Atmosphäre, die Ozeane und die Landoberfläche untersuchen.

Der geplante Satellit wird die Erde von Pol zu Pol in einer Höhe von 675 km umkreisen. Sein mit 360 Umdrehungen pro Minute rotierendes Teleskop erfasst ein Sichtfeld von ± 56,5°. Bei jeder Aufnahme nimmt es eine Fläche von 1 x 16 Pixel auf, die die NASA als „Science Pixel“ bezeichnet. Sie entsprechen einer Fläche von jeweils 1 x 1 km auf der Erdoberfläche. Um ein hohes Signal-Rausch-Verhältnis zu erzielen, erfasst das Teleskop jedes Science Pixel auf der Erdoberfläche bei seiner Rotation 16 Mal und integriert die Signale.

Dieses auf 16 Raumpixeln basierende, breitbandige Signal der Meeresoberfläche wird von einem Parabolspiegel reflektiert, depolarisiert und auf einen rechteckigen Spalt projiziert. Danach wird es gebündelt und von dichroitischen Strahlteilern in blaue und rote Hyperspektralkanäle aufgetrennt. Dabei separieren Beugungsgitter die einzelnen Wellenlängen voneinander und bilden sie auf Time Delay Integration-CCD-Sensoren (TDI-CCD-Sensoren) ab.

Das kurzwellige Infrarotlicht (SWIR) wird mit einem Multibandfilter-Spektrografen analysiert, der ein getrennt von der Empfangsoptik angeordnetes, gekühltes 1 x 16 Detektor-Array enthält. Für das Einkoppeln des Lichtes in das Array wird ein Multimode-Faserbündel (MMF) mit 16 Fasern, einem Kerndurchmesser von jeweils 600 µm und einer numerischen Apertur von 0,22 verwendet. Dieser Ansatz ist dem herkömmlichen System überlegen, bei dem 16 Einzellinsen das vom Teleskop einfallende Licht in das Detektor-Array einkoppeln und bei dem die exakte mechanische Ausrichtung schwer zu gewährleisten und sehr fehleranfällig ist.

Um das kollimierte Licht effizient in die Fasern einzukoppeln, hatte die NASA entschieden, asphärische Mikrolinsen-Arrays (MLA) zu verwenden. Sowohl die MMFs als auch die MLAs benötigen für den Wellenlängenbereich zwischen 0,9 bis 2,3 µm eine breitbandige Antireflexionsbeschichtung, um polarisationsabhängige Verluste zu minimieren.

Der Auswahlprozess

Für die erste Testphase erwarb die NASA marktübliche, lithografisch hergestellte MLAs aus Quarzglas mit einem Pitch – dem Abstand der einzelnen Linsenmitten – von 1,3 mm. Um deren Leistungsfähigkeit zu ermitteln, wurde das Oberflächenprofil der einzelnen Linsen gemessen und mit der gewünschten Kontur verglichen. Dabei wurden deutliche Abweichungen der Pfeilhöhe an den Kanten der Linsen festgestellt (Abb. 2 (i)). Bei optischen Simulationen mithilfe der kommerziellen Software Zemax zeigte sich, dass die an den Kanten gemessenen Konturfehler eine höhere sphärische Aberration verursachen, was in einer geringeren Kopplungseffizienz in die Fasern resultiert.

Darüber hinaus können bei einem Array aus asphärischen Mikrolinsen Abweichungen in der Pfeilhöhe an den Linsenrändern außerdem zur Bildung von Totzonen zwischen den benachbarten Mikrolinsen führen (Abb. 2 (iii)). Deren Einfluss wurde von der NASA mit einem optischen System im Labor ermittelt (siehe Abb. 3 (i)). Dabei wurde weißes Licht, das durch einen rechteckigen Spalt in der Brennebene des Teleskops fiel, gebündelt und auf das MLA gelenkt. Dieses erzeugte 16 runde Bilder der Austrittspupille des Teleskops, die mittels eines telezentrischen Objektives auf eine für das kurzwellige Infrarot ausgelegte Kamera abgebildet war. Die daraus resultierenden Bilder zeigten Streulicht, das von den Übergangszonen zwischen den einzelnen Mikrolinsen ausging (siehe Teil (a) von Abb. 3 (ii)) und auf optische Aberrationen zurückzuführen ist. Dieser Effekt reduziert die Kopplungseffizienz in die optischen Fasern.

Auf der Suche nach MLAs mit einer besseren Kopplungseffizienz entschied die NASA, MLAs zu testen, die nach dem Präzisions-Blankpressverfahren hergestellt wurden. In dieser zweiten Planungsphase testete die NASA asphärische MLAs von INGENERIC (Abb. 4) mit einem Pitch von 1,5 mm. In dieser Testphase erhöhte die NASA den Krümmungsradius der Linsen, um das System an den veränderten Pitch anzupassen.

Um schon zu Beginn des Projektes sicherzustellen, dass die Qualität des Glases und der Beschichtung die Anforderungen erfüllen, hat INGENERIC dem Projektteam plane Glasproben mit einer speziellen Beschichtung zur Verfügung gestellt, die für das gesamte Spektrum von 0,9 bis 2,3 µm optimiert ist. Tests bestätigten, dass sie die Anforderungen an die Transmissivität erfüllt.

Der nächste Schritt war, die Formgenauigkeit der MLAs und die Abbildungseigenschaften zu testen. Deshalb hat INGENERIC das Oberflächenprofil des für die NASA hergestellten MLAs mit einem Setup für die konfokale 3D-Messung (NanoFocus µsurf) geprüft und dieses dann mit den Anforderungen der NASA verglichen. Das Ergebnis (Abb. 2 (ii)) zeigte eine exzellente Übereinstimmung zwischen dem gewünschten und dem von INGENERIC hergestellten Linsenprofil. Die bei INGENERIC hergestellten MLAs weisen Übergangszonen auf, die fast eine Größenordnung kleiner sind als diejenigen der lithografisch hergestellten MLAs. Außerdem zeigte eine Pitch-Analyse der INGENERIC-MLAs eine Genauigkeit von besser als 1 µm.

Weiterhin ermittelte die NASA mit dem oben erwähnten Laborsystem eine im Vergleich mit den vorher verwendeten MLAs deutlich geringere Streulichtintensität aus den Übergangszonen zwischen den einzelnen Linsen (Teil (b) von Abb. 3 (ii)), was wiederum auf eine höhere Leistungsfähigkeit der MLAs hinwies. Während die vorher verwendeten, geätzten MLAs anderer Hersteller die Anforderungen der NASA nicht erfüllten, übertrafen die MLAs von INGENERIC die ursprünglichen Erwartungen deutlich.

Das gute Abschneiden der MLAs von INGENERIC führen beide Projektpartner auf den Herstellprozess zurück: Das Präzisions-Blankpressen asphärischer Mikrolinsen ermöglicht es, die Vorgaben für die Form der Linsen mit höchster Präzision einzuhalten. So erzielen die Linsen eine optimale Qualität der Abbildung. Beim Einkoppeln in Glasfasern gilt dies besonders für die Ränder benachbarter Mikrolinsen: Wenn sie nicht präzise gefertigt sind, wird Licht in die Übergangszonen zwischen den Fasern gestreut und kann nicht für das Einkoppeln genutzt werden. Auch hier punkten die MLAs von INGENRIC in überzeugender Weise.

Der aktuelle Projektstatus

Das OCI wird im Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt im amerikanischen Bundesstaat Maryland gebaut. Zurzeit laufen Labortests auf Komponentenlevel, bei denen die mechanische Justierung der Faserbündel optimiert wird. Die nächsten Schritte werden die Anbindung an das Teleskop und die Untersuchung des gesamten optischen Weges vom Teleskop bis zum Einkoppeln in die Fasern sein. Die Integration in die Engineering Test Unit ist für den Sommer 2019 geplant. Voraussichtlich im Jahr 2022 wird der Satellit den Betrieb im Orbit aufnehmen.

Zusammenfassung

Bei der Entwicklung des „Ocean Color Instruments“ (OCI) für das PACE-Projekt der NASA haben sich Mikrolinsen-Arrays von INGENERIC, die das Unternehmen nach dem Blankpress-Verfahren herstellt, geätzten Arrays als deutlich überlegen gezeigt: Sie übertrafen die ursprünglichen Anforderungen des Kunden und tragen so zu einer signifikant erhöhten Effizienz der Einkopplung des von der Erdoberfläche empfangenen Lichtes in die Glasfaser des optischen Systems eines Satelliten bei.

Blankpressen (Info-Box)

INGENERIC arbeitet mit dem Präzisions-Blankpressverfahren, das sicherstellt, dass Glas mit hohem Brechungsindex exakt die Form des Presswerkzeugs annimmt. Die von dem Unternehmen hergestellten Formen zeigen höchste Präzision bis in den Sub-Mikron-Bereich und erlauben die Herstellung von Arrays mit außergewöhnlich hoher Genauigkeit und Reproduzierbarkeit. INGENERIC fertigt erfolgreich Arrays mit minimalen Übergangszonen, höchsten Füllfaktoren und minimalen Pitch-Fehlern, selbst bei hohen Stückzahlen.

Bei der Entwicklung von Mikrooptik-Komponenten für Spezialanwendungen bietet dieser Prozess ausgesprochen viel Freiheit: Im Vergleich zum Ätzprozess können wesentlich komplexere Optikkomponenten mit einem größeren Aspekt-Verhältnis von Radius und Apertur gefertigt werden. Außerdem überzeugt dieser Prozess mit einer um 0,2 % besseren Radiustoleranz, die auch in der Serienproduktion vollständig reproduzierbar ist.

Die Dimensionen der Arraystrukturen liegen typischerweise im Submillimeterbereich. Die Formgenauigkeit ist besser als 250 nm. Ein weiterer Vorteil sind die kleinen Übergangszonen zwischen den Mikrolinsen, sie sind typischerweise weniger als 10 µm breit. So lassen sich Arrays mit hohen Füllgraden herstellen und der optisch effektive Oberflächenbereich lässt sich effizient nutzen. Vorteil für die Benutzer: Optimale Strahlformung und hocheffiziente Übertragung.

Vor allem bei bestimmten Spezialanwendungen ist die Pitch-Genauigkeit von Mikrolinsen-Arrays sehr wichtig. INGENERIC kann eine äußerst hohe Pitch-Präzision liefern: Das Unternehmen reproduziert die Trennung zwischen den einzelnen Linsenmittelpunkten mit einer Genauigkeit von besser als 2 μm über eine Länge von 25 mm. So wird eine Fehlerakkumulation über die Breite des Arrays vermieden.

Bei einigen Mikrooptiken, vor allem bei zweiseitigen Strukturen, ist die Einhaltung der Mittendicke von höchster Bedeutung, da sie einen Teleskopeffekt haben und selbst geringste Abweichungen zu Aberrationen führen. INGENERIC erreicht hier Genauigkeiten im μm-Bereich.

INGENERIC fertigt Mikrolinsen-Arrays mit asphärischen oder sphärischen Linsen (plankonvex, bikonvex oder konvex-konkav) mit runder, rechteckiger oder hexagonaler Apertur.

Über INGENERIC

INGENERIC GmbH wurde 2001 in der Universitätsstadt Aachen gegründet. Das Unternehmen entwickelt und produziert Hochpräzisions-Mikrooptiken für Hochleistungsanwendungen sowie optische Systeme und Lasersysteme wie Faserkoppler, Homogenisierer und Kollimations-Module für Wissenschaft, Medizin und Messtechnik.

Heute ist INGENERIC eines der wenigen europäischen Unternehmen, das Glasmikrooptiken für die Strahlformung in Halbleiter-Diodenlasern gemäß den spezifischen Anforderungen seiner internationalen Kunden entwickelt und herstellt. Dabei wird der gesamte Prozess vom Entwurf der Linsen und der Produktion von Prototypen bis hin zur Kleinserienfertigung und Massenproduktion abgedeckt.

Abbildungen

Abbildung 1:  (i) Schemazeichnung des geplanten Ocean Color Instrument (OCI) und seiner Subsysteme.
(ii) Funktionsprinzip des OCI (CCD: CCD-Sensor; SWIR: kurzwelliges Infrarot; MLA: Mikrolinsen-Array, MMF: Multimodefaser)

Dateiname:
INGENERIC OCI_NASA.png

 

Abbildung 2:  (i) Vergleich der gemessenen Pfeilhöhen von lithografischen Linsen mit der geforderten (freie Apertur: 1,3 mm)
(ii) Vergleich der gemessenen Pfeilhöhen der INGENERIC-Linsen mit den geforderten (freie Apertur 1,5 mm)
(iii) Qualitative Beschreibung und Vergleich der Totzonen zwischen benachbarten Mikrolinsen in lithografischen MLAs (blau) und MLAs von INGENERIC (rot)

Dateiname:
INGENERIC Profile comparison.png

 

Abbildung 3:  (i) Laboraufbau für die quantitative Analyse des MLA
(ii) Intensitätsverteilung der Abbildung hinter zwei benachbarten Mikrolinsen in (a) einem lithografischen MLA und (b) einem MLA von INGENERIC bei Weißlicht

Dateiname:
INGENERIC NASA_MLA-characterization setup.png

 

Abbildung 4:  Das Mikrolinsen-Array für die PACE-Mission, das von INGENERIC nach dem Blankpress-Verfahren hergestellt wurde

Dateiname:
INGENERIC_JB83199.jpg

 

Bildrechte: Abb. 1, 2 (i), 3: NASA; Abb. 2 (ii), 2 (iii), 4: INGENERIC GmbH

INGENERIC erweitert die Produktionskapazität

INGENERIC expands production capacities

Am 30. Mai hat INGENERIC den Grundstein für das neue Firmengebäude in Baesweiler gelegt. Mit dem Neubau reagiert das Unternehmen auf den beständig steigenden Auftragseingang von Kunden aus aller Welt. — On May 30, INGENERIC laid the foundation stone for their new company building in Baesweiler, Germany. The new building is the company’s response to the constantly increasing volume of orders from customers all over the world.

weiterlesen

Aachen, 18. Juni 2018   Am 30. Mai hat INGENERIC den Grundstein für das neue Firmengebäude in Baesweiler gelegt. Mit dem Neubau reagiert das Unternehmen auf den beständig steigenden Auftragseingang von Kunden aus aller Welt. Das Gebäude, dessen Fertigstellung für Ende 2019 geplant ist, wird Platz für alle rund 80 Mitarbeiter schaffen und Raum für die weitere Expansion bieten.

INGENERIC ist seit der Gründung im Jahr 2001 im Aachener Technologiezentrum beheimatet und hatte schon 2015 einige Bereiche in das etwa 20 km entfernte Baesweiler ausgelagert. Im Laufe der Jahre ist das Unternehmen so gewachsen, dass jetzt ein eigenes Firmengebäude erforderlich wurde. Der Schritt aus dem Technologiezentrum heraus ist dabei die logische Konsequenz.

Die neue Produktionshalle in unmittelbarer Nähe eines ehemaligen Bergwerksgeländes umfasst eine Bruttofläche von rund 2.700 m². In der Halle entstehen etwa 800 m² Reinraumfläche für die Fertigung und Veredelung der optischen Elemente sowie die Montage von Optikmodulen und Lasersystemen, außerdem rund 600 m² klimatisierte Bearbeitungsbereiche für die Ultrapräzisionsfertigung, in denen die Temperatur teilweise auf +/-0,5 °C geregelt wird. Das angegliederte Bürogebäude für Entwicklung, Vertrieb und Verwaltung wird mehr als 1.000 m² Bruttofläche bieten.

Mit seinen gut 10.000 m² Fläche hat das Grundstück Platz für die weitere Expansion.

Dr. Olaf Rübenach, einer der beiden Geschäftsführer und Mitbegründer von INGENERIC, sieht deutliche Vorteile am Standort Baesweiler in der Technologieregion Aachen: „Das neue Gebäude entspricht mit seiner Infrastruktur exakt den Anforderungen, die wir an die effiziente Produktion von Ultrapräzisionsoptiken stellen. Wir werden nicht nur ausreichend Platz für das jetzige Produktionsvolumen haben, sondern können auch weiter expandieren. Die Mikrooptik ist eine der bedeutenden Schrittmacher-Technologien des 21. Jahrhunderts und wir erwarten erhebliche Zuwachsraten.“

Planung und Bau des Gebäudes erfolgen in Zusammenarbeit mit der TRUMPF GmbH + Co. KG, die als Muttergesellschaft von INGENERIC auch Bauherr ist. Das Gebäude soll bis Ende 2019 bezugsfertig sein.

2.100 Zeichen einschließlich Vorspann und Leerzeichen

Über INGENERIC

Die 2001 am Technologie- und Forschungsstandort Aachen gegründete INGENERIC GmbH entwickelt und produziert hochpräzise mikrooptische Komponenten für High-Power-Applikationen sowie optische Systeme und Lasersysteme wie Faserkoppler, Homogenisierer und Kollimations-Module für Wissenschaft, Medizin und Messtechnik.

Heute ist INGENERIC einer der wenigen Hersteller in Europa, der Mikrooptiken aus Glas für die Strahlformung in Halbleiter-Diodenlasern nach den individuellen Vorgaben seiner internationalen Kunden entwickelt und produziert. Dabei deckt das Unternehmen die gesamte Prozesskette vom Design der Linsen und der Entwicklung von Prototypen über die Kleinserie bis hin zur Serienfertigung ab.

Außerdem stellt INGENERIC Hochleistungs-Lasersysteme her. Für das HiLASE oder XFEL Projekt zum Beispiel hat INGENERIC bereits mehrere Hochenergie-Laser geliefert, die pro Sekunde 10 Pulse mit einer Energie von 250 Joule bei einer mittleren Leistung von 2,5 kW abgeben und sich durch ein äußerst homogenes Tophat-Strahlprofil mit einem Amplitudenkontrast von weniger als 7 Prozent auszeichnen.

Hintergrund: Die Präzision im Detail

Eins von mehreren Anwendungsgebieten ist die Herstellung von Mikrolinsenarrays, deren Strukturen sich typisch im Submillimeter-Bereich bewegen; ihre Formgenauigkeit liegt mit weniger als 250 nm im Submikrometer-Bereich. Dies macht es möglich, Arrays mit hohen Füllfaktoren herzustellen und die optisch wirksame Fläche optimal auszunutzen: Übergangszonen von weniger als 10 μm realisiert INGENERIC mit hoher Prozesssicherheit. Der Nutzen für den Anwender: Optimale Strahlformung und hohe Effizienz bei Übertragung und Kopplung.

Das Blankpressen gestattet es außerdem, bei beidseitigen Optiken den Versatz zwischen Ober- und Unterseite des Arrays auf weniger als 5 μm genau einzuhalten. Hinzu kommt eine sehr hohe Pitch-Genauigkeit: Den Abstand der einzelnen Linsenmittelpunkte reproduziert INGENERIC mit einer Genauigkeit von besser als 2 µm auf 25 mm Länge, so kumulieren Fehler nicht über die Breite des Arrays.

Für einige Mikrooptiken – besonders für beidseitige Strukturen – ist das genaue Einhalten der Mittendicke sehr wichtig, da sie teleskopisch wirken und kleinste Abweichungen zu Abbildungsfehlern führen. Hier erzielt INGENERIC Genauigkeiten von etwa +/-6 µm.

Im Vergleich mit klassischen Verfahren – beispielsweise dem Quarzätzen – realisiert INGENERIC eine relative Radiustoleranz von besser als 0,2 Prozent, die bei der Serienproduktion von Wafer zu Wafer exakt reproduziert wird.

Über TRUMPF

Das Hochtechnologieunternehmen TRUMPF bietet Fertigungslösungen in den Bereichen Werkzeugmaschinen und Lasertechnik. Die digitale Vernetzung der produzierenden Industrie treibt das Unternehmen durch Beratung, Plattform- und Softwareangebote voran. TRUMPF ist Technologie- und Marktführer bei Werkzeugmaschinen für die flexible Blechbearbeitung und bei industriellen Lasern.

Kontakt:

INGENERIC GmbH
Christina Ferwer
Dennewartstraße 25-27
52068 Aachen
Tel. +49.241.963-3951
Fax +49.241.963-1349
www.ingeneric.com
ferwer@ingeneric.com

Ansprechpartner für die Presse:

VIP Kommunikation
Dr.-Ing. Uwe Stein
Dennewartstraße 25-27
52068 Aachen
Tel.:  +49.241.89468-55
Fax:  +49.241.89468-44
www.vip-kommunikation.de
stein@vip-kommunikation.de

Abbildungen

Bild 1:     Die Produktionshalle (rechts) bietet ideale Bedingungen für die Herstellung von Ultrapräzisionsoptiken

Dateiname:
Hinten Halle einfarbig.jpg

 

Bild 2:     Mit einer Größe von rund 10.000 m² bietet das Grundstück Platz für die weitere Expansion des Unternehmens.

Dateiname:
Luftbild vorne.jpg

 

Bild 3:     Dr. Stefan Hambücker (links) und Dr. Olaf Rübenach, die beiden Geschäftsführer von INGENERIC, bei der Grundsteinlegung.

Dateiname:
Ingeneric IMG_1486 .jpg

 

Bild 4:     Ein Mikrolinsen Array mit 400 Linsen

Dateiname:
Ingeneric_MLA 1.jpg

 

Bild 5:     Beidseitiges Zylinderlinsen-Array, gekreuzt

Dateiname:
Ingeneric_MLA 3.jpg

 


Bildrechte: Bilder 1 und 2: Planungsbüro Ring, Bilder 3, 4 und 5: INGENERIC

read more

Aachen, Germany, June 18, 2018—On May 30, INGENERIC laid the foundation stone for their new company building in Baesweiler, Germany. The new building is the company’s response to the constantly increasing volume of orders from customers all over the world. The building, which is scheduled to be completed by the end of 2019, will provide space for all of the approx. 80 employees with reserves for further expansion.

INGENERIC has been based in the Technology Centre AGIT in Aachen since its foundation in 2001, and in 2015 they already outsourced some capacities to Baesweiler, about 20 km away. Growth over the years is such that the company now requires its own building. The move away from the Technologiezentrum is a logical step.

The new production hall in the immediate vicinity of a former colliery covers a gross area of around 2,700 m². The hall will provide around 800 m² of clean room space for the production and finishing of optical elements along with the assembly of optical modules and laser systems. There is also around 600 m² for air-conditioned processing space for ultra-precision manufacturing, where temperatures are partially controlled to within +/-0.5° C. The attached office building for development, sales and administration will offer more than 1,000 m² gross floor space.

With a good 10,000 m² of space, the site offers the potential for further expansion.

Dr. Olaf Ruebenach, co-founder and one of the two managing directors of INGENERIC, sees clear advantages at the Baesweiler site in the Aachen technology region: “The new building and its infrastructure exactly meet our requirements for the efficient production of ultra-precision optics. Not only will we have enough space for the current production volume, we can also continue to expand. Micro-optics is one of the major pace-setting technologies of the 21st century, and we expect significant growth rates.”

Planning and construction of the building are being carried out in cooperation with TRUMPF GmbH Co. KG which, as the parent company of INGENERIC, is also the builder-owner. The building should be ready for occupancy by the end of 2019.

340 words including introduction

About INGENERIC

Founded in 2001 in the university-city of Aachen, Germany, INGENERIC GmbH develops and manufactures high-precision micro-optic components for high-power applications, along with optical and laser systems including fiber couplers, homogenizers and collimation modules for science, medicine and measurement technology.

Today, INGENERIC is one of the few manufacturers in Europe to develop and manufacture glass micro-optics for beam shaping in semiconductor diode lasers according to the individual specifications of its international customers. The company handles the entire process chain from the lens design and the development of prototypes through to the small-batch production and serial manufacture.

INGENERIC also produces high-power laser systems. For the HiLASE or XFEL project, for example, INGENERIC supplied a number of high-energy lasers delivering 10 pulses per second with an energy of 250 Joules, an average power output of 2.5 kW, and an extremely homogeneous top-hat beam profile with an amplitude contrast of less than 7%.

Background: Precision in detail

One of several fields of application is the production of microlens arrays with structures typically in the sub-millimeter range; their dimensional accuracy is sub-micrometer at less than 250 nm. This makes it possible to produce arrays with high filling factors and to make the best possible use of the optically effective surface area: INGENERIC reliably implements transition zones of less than 10 μm. The benefit to the user: Optimal beam shaping and high-efficiency transmission and coupling.

High-precision molding maintains an offset between the upper and lower sides of the array of less than 5 μm. Pitch accuracy is also very high: INGENERIC reproduces the separation between the individual lens center points with an accuracy of better than 2 μm over a length of 25 mm, so there is no accumulation of errors across the width of the array.

For some micro-optics—particularly the two-sided structures—the exact adherence to the central thickness is vitally important, since they have a telescopic effect and the slightest deviations lead to aberrations. INGENERIC achieves accuracies close to +/-6 μm here.

Compared to conventional methods like quartz etching, INGENERIC achieves a relative radius tolerance better than 0.2 percent, which in serial production is precisely reproducible from wafer to wafer.

About TRUMPF

The high-technology company TRUMPF offers production solutions in the machine tool and laser sectors. It drives digital connectivity in manufacturing industries through consulting activities, platform and software offerings. TRUMPF is a technology and market leader in machine tools for flexible sheet metal processing and industrial lasers.

Contact:

INGENERIC GmbH
Christina Ferwer
Dennewartstraße 25-27
52068 Aachen, Germany
Tel. +49.241.963-3951
Fax +49.241.963-1349
www.ingeneric.com
ferwer@ingeneric.com

Press contact:

VIP Kommunikation
Dr.-Ing. Uwe Stein
Dennewartstraße 25-27
52068 Aachen, Germany
Tel.:  +49.241.89468-55
Fax:  +49.241.89468-44
www.vip-kommunikation.de
stein@vip-kommunikation.de

Images

Image 1:  The production hall (right) offers ideal conditions for the production of ultra-precision optics

File name:
Hinten Halle einfarbig.jpg

Copyright: Planungsbüro Ring

 

Image 2:  Sized at around 10,000 m², the site offers space for the company’s further expansion going forward.

File name:
Luftbild vorne.jpg

Copyright: Planungsbüro Ring

 

Image 3:  Dr. Stefan Hambuecker (left) and Dr. Olaf Ruebenach, the co-founders and managing directors of INGENERIC, at the laying of the foundation stone.

File name:
INGENERIC IMG_1486.jpg

Copyright: INGENERIC

 

Image 4:  A microlens array with 400 lenses

File name:
Ingeneric_MLA 1.jpg

Copyright: INGENERIC

 

Image 5:  Double-sided cylindrical lens array, crossed

File name:
Ingeneric_MLA 3.jpg

Copyright: INGENERIC

 


Copyright: Images 1 and 2: Planungsbüro Ring, Images 3, 4 and 5: INGENERIC

INGENERIC: Neue Mikrolinsen-Arrays mit mehr Linsen pro Wafer

INGENERIC: New microlens arrays with more lenses per wafer

Erstmals stellt INGENERIC auf den diesjährigen Messen „LASER World of PHOTONICS CHINA 2018“ und „OFC 2018“ die neuen Mikrolinsen-Arrays mit kürzeren Brennweiten und einer höheren Anzahl von Linsen pro Wafer vor. | INGENERIC premiers the new microlens arrays with shorter focal lengths and a higher number of lenses per wafer as they exhibit at this year's trade fairs “LASER World of PHOTONICS CHINA 2018” and “OFC 2018”.

weiterlesen

Aachen, 22. Februar 2018    Erstmals stellt INGENERIC auf den diesjährigen Messen „LASER World of PHOTONICS CHINA 2018“ und „OFC 2018“ die neuen Mikrolinsen-Arrays mit kürzeren Brennweiten und einer höheren Anzahl von Linsen pro Wafer vor. Das Unternehmen entwickelt individuelle Arrays für Kunden und führt sie in die wirtschaftliche Serienproduktion über.

Auf der Messe präsentiert das Unternehmen aus der Technologieregion Aachen seine neuen Mikrolinsen-Arrays mit bis zu 500 einzelnen Linsen und Abmessungen bis zu 50 x 50 mm, die zum Beispiel für die Strahlformung und das Homogenisieren von Licht verwendet werden.

Mit den neuen Arrays entspricht INGENERIC dem Wunsch vieler Kunden, Brennweiten bis hinab zu 0,3 mm zu realisieren.

Dr.-Ing. Stefan Hambücker, Geschäftsführer von INGENERIC, sieht deutliche Vorteile für seine Kunden: „Wir beobachten einen ausgeprägten Trend zu kürzeren Brennweiten. Das bedeutet für uns, dass wir Optiken mit erheblich kleineren Radien als bisher herstellen müssen. Hier haben wir in den vergangenen Monaten deutliche Fortschritte erzielt. Auf den beiden Messen präsentieren wir die Ergebnisse unserer aktuellen Entwicklungsarbeit: Mehr Linsen pro Wafer mit kürzeren Brennweiten auf größeren Arrays.“

Für Optiken mit kurzer Brennweite hat INGENERIC die belegbare Fläche auf bis zu 10 x 10 mm erhöht und so das bisherige Produktspektrum deutlich erweitert. Dabei nutzt das Unternehmen weiterhin seine bewährte Technologie, die größte Reproduzierbarkeit und engste Toleranzen garantiert. Diese Vorteile machen INGENERIC zu einem führenden Hersteller für Mikrolinsen-Arrays.

Für die Fertigung der Arrays wendet INGENERIC das Präzisions-Blankpressen an, bei dem hochbrechendes Glas exakt die Form des Presswerkzeugs annimmt. Da das Unternehmen die Formen mit Submikron-Präzision fertigt, erzielt es bei der Produktion der Arrays außergewöhnlich hohe Genauigkeit und Reproduzierbarkeit. So gelingt es INGENERIC, Arrays mit minimalen Übergangszonen, höchsten Füllfaktoren und kleinsten Pitch-Fehlern prozesssicher auch in Großserien herzustellen.

Beim Entwurf von Mikrooptiken für spezielle Anwendungen bietet das Verfahren darüber hinaus große Freiheit: Im Vergleich mit dem Ätzverfahren können komplexere Optiken mit größerem Aspektverhältnis von Radius und Apertur realisiert werden. Darüber hinaus zeichnet sich das Verfahren durch eine relative Radiustoleranz von besser als 0,2 Prozent aus, die bei der Serienproduktion genau reproduzierbar ist.

INGENERIC stellt Mikrolinsen-Arrays mit asphärischen oder sphärischen Linsen her, die plankonvex, bikonvex oder konvex-konkav sind sowie eine runde, rechteckige oder hexagonale Apertur aufweisen.

2.600 Zeichen einschließlich Leerzeichen und Vorspann

INGENERIC auf der „OFC“:
San Diego, Kalifornien, USA
13. bis 15. März 20178:

Stand Nr. 4601 (Deutscher Gemeinschaftsstand)

INGENERIC auf der „LASER World of PHOTONICS CHINA“:
Shanghai, China
14. bis 16. März 20178:
Halle W1, Stand 1715

Hintergrund: Die Präzision im Detail

Die Array-Strukturen bewegen sich typisch im Submillimeter-Bereich, die Formgenauigkeit liegt mit weniger als 250 nm im Submikrometer-Bereich. Dies macht es möglich, Arrays mit hohen Füllfaktoren herzustellen und die optisch wirksame Fläche optimal auszunutzen: Übergangszonen von weniger als 10 μm realisiert INGENERIC mit hoher Prozesssicherheit. Der Nutzen für den Anwender: Optimale Strahlformung und hohe Effizienz bei Übertragung und Kopplung.

Das Blankpressen gestattet es außerdem, bei beidseitigen Optiken den Versatz zwischen Ober- und Unterseite des Arrays auf weniger als 5 μm genau einzuhalten. Hinzu kommt eine sehr hohe Pitch-Genauigkeit: Den Abstand der einzelnen Linsenmittelpunkte reproduziert INGENERIC mit einer Genauigkeit von besser als 2 µm auf 25 mm Länge, so kumulieren Fehler nicht über die Breite des Arrays.

Für einige Mikrooptiken – besonders für beidseitige Strukturen – ist das genaue Einhalten der Mittendicke sehr wichtig, da sie teleskopisch wirken und kleinste Abweichungen zu Abbildungsfehlern führen. Hier erzielt INGENERIC Genauigkeiten von etwa +/-6 µm.

Im Vergleich mit klassischen Verfahren – beispielsweise dem Quarzätzen – realisiert INGENERIC eine relative Radiustoleranz von besser als 0,2 Prozent, die bei der Serienproduktion von Wafer zu Wafer exakt reproduziert wird.

1.300 Zeichen einschließlich Leerzeichen

Über INGENERIC

Die 2001 am Technologie- und Forschungsstandort Aachen gegründete INGENERIC GmbH entwickelt und produziert hochpräzise mikrooptische Komponenten für High-Power-Applikationen sowie optische Systeme und Lasersysteme wie Faserkoppler, Homogenisierer und Kollimations-Module für Wissenschaft, Medizin und Messtechnik.

Heute ist INGENERIC einer der wenigen Hersteller in Europa, der Mikrooptiken aus Glas für die Strahlformung in Halbleiter-Diodenlasern nach den individuellen Vorgaben seiner internationalen Kunden entwickelt und produziert. Dabei deckt das Unternehmen die gesamte Prozesskette vom Design der Linsen und der Entwicklung von Prototypen über die Kleinserie bis hin zur Serienfertigung ab.

Außerdem stellt INGENERIC Hochleistungs-Lasersysteme her. Für das HiLASE oder XFEL Projekt zum Beispiel hat INGENERIC bereits mehrere Hochenergie-Laser geliefert, die pro Sekunde 10 Pulse mit einer Energie von 250 Joule bei einer mittleren Leistung von 2,5 kW abgeben und sich durch ein äußerst homogenes Tophat-Strahlprofil mit einem Amplitudenkontrast von weniger als 7 Prozent auszeichnen.

Kontakt:

INGENERIC GmbH
Christina Ferwer
Dennewartstraße 25-27
52068 Aachen
Tel. +49.241.963-3951
Fax +49.241.963-1349
www.ingeneric.com
ferwer@ingeneric.com

Ansprechpartner für die Presse:

VIP Kommunikation
Dr.-Ing. Uwe Stein
Dennewartstraße 25-27
52068 Aachen
Tel.:  +49.241.89468-55
Fax:  +49.241.89468-44
www.vip-kommunikation.de
stein@vip-kommunikation.de

Abbildungen

Bild 1:     Einseitiges Mikrolinsen Array mit 400 Linsenelementen und quadratischer Apertur, zweidimensional

Dateiname:
Ingeneric_MLA 1.jpg

 

Bild 2a:   Beidseitiges Zylinderlinsen-Array, gekreuzt

Dateiname:
Ingeneric_MLA 2.jpg

 

Bild 2b:   Beidseitiges Zylinderlinsen-Array, gekreuzt

Dateiname:
Ingeneric_MLA 3.jpg

 

Bild 3:     Einseitiges asphärisches Mikrolinsen-Array mit rechteckiger Apertur der Einzellinse, eindimensional

Dateiname:
Ingeneric_MLA 4.jpg

 

Bild 4:     Zweidimensionales Mikrolinsen-Array, plankonvex mit rotationssymmetrischer Apertur

Dateiname:
Ingeneric_MLA 5.jpg

 

Bildrechte: Ingeneric

read more

Aachen, February 13, 2018—INGENERIC premiers the new microlens arrays with shorter focal lengths and a higher number of lenses per wafer as they exhibit at this year's trade fairs “LASER World of PHOTONICS CHINA 2018” and “OFC 2018”. The company develops customized arrays and brings them to commercial serial production.

At the trade fair, the company based in Aachen, Germany presents its new microlens arrays with up to 500 individual lenses and dimensions of up to 50 x 50 mm, which are used, for example, for beam shaping and light homogenization.

With the new arrays, INGENERIC addresses the requests of numerous customers to implement focal lengths of down to 0.3 mm.

Dr. Stefan Hambücker, a Managing Director at INGENERIC, sees clear advantages for customers: “We are seeing a pronounced trend towards shorter focal lengths. The consequence is that we have to produce optics with significantly smaller radii than before. We have made substantial progress here in recent months. These two fairs are the opportunity to present our latest developments: More lenses per wafer with shorter focal lengths on larger arrays.”

For optics with a short focal length, INGENERIC has increased the usable surface area to 10 x 10 mm and thus significantly expanded the existing product range. The company continues to use its proven technology, which guarantees maximum reproducibility and tightest tolerances. These advantages make INGENERIC a leading manufacturer of microlens arrays.

INGENERIC works with precision molding techniques, which ensure that high refractive index glass takes on precisely the form of the molding tool. The molds manufactured by the company to sub-micron precision enable the arrays to be produced with exceptionally high accuracy and reproducibility. INGENERIC successfully manufactures arrays with minimal transition zones, highest filling factors and minimal pitch errors, even in large batches.

When it comes to designing micro-optics for special applications, the process offers significant degrees of freedom: Compared to the etching process, optics can be far more complex with a larger radius-to-aperture aspect ratio. Furthermore, the process excels with a relative radius tolerance better than 0.2%, which is fully reproducible in serial production.

INGENERIC manufactures microlens arrays with aspherical or spherical lenses that are planoconvex, biconvex or convex-concave, and which have a circular, rectangular or hexagonal aperture.

2,600 characters with spaces and header

INGENERIC at the “OFC”:
San Diego, California, USA
March 13 – 15, 2018:

Stand no. 4601 (German Pavilion)

INGENERIC at the LASER World of PHOTONICS CHINA:
Shanghai, China
March 14 – 16, 2018:
Hall W1, Booth 1715

Background: Precision in detail

The array structures typically have dimensions in the sub-millimeter range, and the dimensional accuracy is sub-micrometer at less than 250 nm. This makes it possible to produce arrays with high filling factors and to make the best possible use of the optically effective surface area: INGENERIC reliably implements transition zones of less than 10 μm. The benefit to the user: Optimal beam shaping and high-efficiency transmission.

High-precision molding maintains an offset between the upper and lower sides of the array of less than 5 μm. Pitch accuracy is also very high: INGENERIC reproduces the separation between the individual lens center points with an accuracy of better than 2 μm over a length of 25 mm, so there is no accumulation of errors across the width of the array.

For some micro-optics—particularly the two-sided structures—the exact adherence to the central thickness is vitally important, since they have a telescopic effect and the slightest deviations lead to aberrations. INGENERIC achieves accuracies close to +/-6 μm here.

Compared to conventional methods like quartz etching, INGENERIC achieves a relative radius tolerance better than 0.2 percent, which in serial production is precisely reproducible from wafer to wafer.

1,300 characters with spaces

About INGENERIC

Founded in 2001 in the university-city of Aachen, Germany, INGENERIC GmbH develops and manufactures high-precision micro-optic components for high-power applications, along with optical and laser systems including fiber couplers, homogenizers and collimation modules for science, medicine and measurement technology.

Today, INGENERIC is one of the few manufacturers in Europe to develop and manufacture glass micro-optics for beam shaping in semiconductor diode lasers according to the individual specifications of its international customers. The company handles the entire process chain from the lens design and the development of prototypes through to the small-batch production and serial manufacture.

INGENERIC also produces high-power laser systems. For the HiLASE or XFEL project, for example, INGENERIC supplied a number of high-energy lasers delivering 10 pulses per second with an energy of 250 Joules, an average power output of 2.5 kW, and an extremely homogeneous top-hat beam profile with an amplitude contrast of less than 7%.

Contact:

INGENERIC GmbH
Christina Ferwer
Dennewartstraße 25-27
52068 Aachen, Germany
Tel. +49.241.963-3951
Fax +49.241.963-1349
www.ingeneric.com
ferwer@ingeneric.com

Press contact:

VIP Kommunikation
Dr.-Ing. Uwe Stein
Dennewartstraße 25-27
52068 Aachen, Germany
Tel.:  +49.241.89468-55
Fax:  +49.241.89468-44
www.vip-kommunikation.de
stein@vip-kommunikation.de

Images

Image 1:  Single-sided microlens array with 400 lens elements and square aperture, two-dimensional

File name:
Ingeneric_MLA 1.jpg

 

Image 2a:         Double-sided cylindrical lens array, crossed

File name:
Ingeneric_MLA 2.jpg

 

Image 2b:        Double-sided cylindrical lens array, crossed

File name:
Ingeneric_MLA 3.jpg

 

Image 3:  Single-sided aspherical microlens array with rectangular aperture of each individual lens, one-dimensional

File name:
Ingeneric_MLA 4.jpg

 

Image 4:  Two-dimensional microlens array, planoconvex with rotationally symmetric aperture

File name:
Ingeneric_MLA 5.jpg

 

Copyright: Ingeneric

INGENERIC: Neues Kollimationsmodul für Single-Mode-Diodenbarren macht Brightness und Strahlqualität nutzbar

INGENERIC: New collimation module for single-mode diode bars utilizes brightness and beam quality

Beidseitig strukturierte, monolithische Mikrooptiken erschließen den Herstellern von Diodenlasern neue Märkte |Monolithic micro-optics structured on both sides open up new markets for diode-laser manufacturers.

Auf der „Photonics West 2018“ stellt INGENERIC erstmals das neue Mikrooptik-Modul „C-SMDB“ vor, das das Unternehmen für die Kollimation von Single-Mode-Diodenbarren entwickelt hat.| At the “Photonics West 2018”, INGENERIC for the first time presents the new micro-optics module “C-SMDB”, developed by the company for the collimation of single-mode diode bars.

weiterlesen

Aachen, 19. Dezember 2017    Auf der „Photonics West 2018“ stellt INGENERIC erstmals das neue Mikrooptik-Modul „C-SMDB“ vor, das das Unternehmen für die Kollimation von Single-Mode-Diodenbarren entwickelt hat. Mit ihm kann die bessere Brightness der Laser ausgenutzt werden – so eröffnet es den Herstellern der Laser neue Anwendungsfelder.

Single-Mode Barren können aufgrund der hohen Anzahl von Einzelemittern eine hohe Leistung erzielen. Darüber hinaus ist die Strahlqualität der Einzelemitter im Vergleich zu Breitstreifenemittern besser, da jeder Emitter grundmodig Licht emittiert. Um diese Vorteile nutzen zu können, muss ein Optikmodul das Lichtbündel jedes einzelnen Emitters separat kollimieren. Aufgrund der dichten Anordnung der Emitter werden kompakte Mikrooptiken mit feinsten Strukturen benötigt. Das neue Kollimationsmodul ermöglicht es, die hohe Leistung der Single-Mode-Diodenbarren optimal zu nutzen und erlaubt das Erschließen neuer Anwendungen.

Das neue monolithische Zylinderlinsen-Array „C-SMDB“ von INGENERIC für Single-Mode-Barren erzielt aufgrund der Fertigung mit dem Präzisions-Blankpress-Verfahren eine besonders hohe Güte der Kollimation. Das Array wirkt doppelseitig: Die Eintrittsseite kollimiert die Slow-Axis, die Austrittsseite die Fast-Axis des emittierten Lichtes.

An die Fertigungsgenauigkeit der Mikrooptiken werden erheblich höhere Anforderungen gestellt als es bei den Optiken für Dioden mit Breitstreifenemittern der Fall ist. Der Pitch zwischen den einzelnen Linsenelementen auf der Slow-Axis-Seite zum Beispiel muss extrem genau eingehalten werden: Für 200 Elemente muss der Pitch im Mittel jeweils kleiner als 5 Nanometer sein. Auch die Mittendicke soll idealerweise im Bereich von +/- zwei Mikrometern liegen, um ein optimales Ergebnis zu erreichen.

Diese Herausforderung erfüllt INGENERIC mit dem Präzisions-Blankpressen der Arrays, das das Unternehmen auch für andere Mikrooptiken seines Produktportfolios einsetzt. Beim Blankpressen nimmt hoch brechendes Glas exakt die Form des Presswerkzeugs an. Da INGENERIC die Formen mit Submikron-Präzision fertigt, erzielt das Unternehmen bei der Produktion der Arrays eine außergewöhnlich hohe Genauigkeit und Reproduzierbarkeit. So gelingt es INGENERIC, Arrays mit minimalen Übergangszonen, höchsten Füllfaktoren und kleinsten Pitch-Fehlern prozesssicher auch in Großserien herzustellen.

Dr.-Ing. Stefan Hambücker, Geschäftsführer von INGENERIC, sieht ein hohes Potenzial für Diodenlaser: „Bei den Single-Mode-Barren geht es zurzeit noch darum, Funktionalität und Wirtschaftlichkeit für neue Anwendungsfelder nachzuweisen. Deshalb arbeiten wir in Bezug auf die Optik mit den Herstellern der Diodenlaser intensiv zusammen. Mit hohen Füllungsgraden, einer exzellenten Ausnutzung der Flächen, extrem hoher Konturgenauigkeit sowie einer guten Orientierung der Flächen zueinander ist das C-SMDB genau das richtige Produkt, um die Brightness optimal zu nutzen.“

Das neue Array hat eine Design-Wellenlänge von 970 nm. Die EFL (Effective Focal Length) der FAC (Fast-Axis Collimation) beträgt 600 µm bei einer numerischen Apertur von 0,8, die EFL der SAC (Slow-Axis Collimation) liegt bei 190 µm und der Pitch der SAC bei 48 µm. Dabei befinden sich 200 Linsenelemente auf jedem Teil. Es ergibt sich eine BFL (Back Focal Length) von 179 µm.

beamPROP Strahlformungsoptik

INGENERIC zeigt auf der Messe außerdem die Strahlformungsoptik beamPROP 200, ein Linsen-Array, das das Strahlparameter Produkt (beam parameter product “BPP”) der Fast- und Slow-Axis von Hochleistungs-Diodenlasern angleicht. Er ist eine Schlüsselkomponente für die Faserkopplung von Diodenbarren und die Dichte Wellenlängen-Kopplung (DWM, Dense Wavelength Multiplexing).

Neu ist, dass INGENERIC neben Arrays mit einem Pitch von bisher 500 und 400 µm jetzt auch solche mit einem Pitch von 200 µm herstellt. So können die Emitter auf den Barren dichter angeordnet und die nutzbare Leistung erhöht werden – ein notwendiger Schritt, um die Wirtschaftlichkeit in der Anwendung zu steigern. Damit trägt der beamPROP 200 wie das C-SMDB dazu bei, das Spektrum der Anwendung von Diodenlasern zu erweitern.

Christian Wessling, der Leiter der Produktentwicklung bei INGENERIC, sieht das Unternehmen für neue Anwendungen als Wegbereiter: „Beim DWM, für das der beamPROP eingesetzt wird, arbeiten mehrere Hersteller von Diodenbarren noch an einem umfassenden Konzept – die Optik ist dabei ein entscheidender Bestandteil. Wir entwickeln diese Technik gemeinsam mit ihnen Schritt für Schritt weiter. Hier sehen wir uns als Enabler, der hilft, neue Anwendungen zu erschließen.“

4.600 Zeichen einschließlich Leerzeichen und Vorspann

INGENERIC auf der „SPIE Photonics West“
San Francisco/USA, 27.1. bis 1.2.2018:
Stand 5153

Hintergrundinformation zum Branchentrend

Diodenlaser zeichnen sich durch ihre kompakte Bauweise, hohen Wirkungsgrad, lange Wartungsintervalle und hohe Lebensdauer aus. Obwohl der Diodenlaser bereits für zahlreiche Anwendungen qualifiziert ist, ist der Aufbau des Bauteils immer noch der limitierende Faktor für die erreichbare Brightness. Auch die Strahlqualität reicht für einige Anwendungen – zum Beispiel in der Materialbearbeitung – heute noch nicht aus.

Das Bestreben der Hersteller von Diodenlasern ist, neue Anwendungsfelder für ihre Produkte zu erschließen. Im Vordergrund stehen die Brightness und die Strahlqualität der Diodenlaser. Alle aktuellen Entwicklungen zielen darauf ab, diese Eigenschaften zu verbessern, um zum Beispiel beim Multiplexen (DWM) die Wellenlängen zu stabilisieren und damit eine höhere Leistung in dünnere Fasern zu koppeln oder die Brightness von Single-Mode-Barren optimal zu nutzen. Für beide Lösungsansätze führt der Weg über spezielle Mikrooptiken für Kollimation und Strahlformung. Im Vergleich mit etablierten Aufbauten, bei denen FAC, SAC, Umlenkspiegel und Koppeloptiken verwendet werden, um Leistung in eine Faser zu koppeln, ist jedoch noch Entwicklungsarbeit zu leisten. Die neuen Mikrooptiken von INGENERIC bieten jedoch das Potenzial, die Brightness etablierter Ansätze zu übertreffen und damit neue Anwendungen zu erschließen.

1.300 Zeichen einschließlich Leerzeichen und Vorspann

Über INGENERIC

Die 2001 am Technologie- und Forschungsstandort Aachen gegründete INGENERIC GmbH entwickelt und produziert hochpräzise mikrooptische Komponenten für High-Power-Applikationen sowie optische Systeme und Lasersysteme wie Faserkoppler, Homogenisierer und Kollimations-Module für Wissenschaft, Medizin und Messtechnik.

Heute ist INGENERIC einer der wenigen Hersteller in Europa, der Mikrooptiken aus Glas für die Strahlformung in Halbleiter-Diodenlasern nach den individuellen Vorgaben seiner internationalen Kunden entwickelt und produziert. Dabei deckt das Unternehmen die gesamte Prozesskette vom Design der Linsen und der Entwicklung von Prototypen über die Kleinserie bis hin zur Serienfertigung ab.

Außerdem stellt INGENERIC Hochleistungs-Lasersysteme her. Für das HiLASE oder XFEL Projekt zum Beispiel hat INGENERIC bereits mehrere Hochenergie-Laser geliefert, die pro Sekunde 10 Pulse mit einer Energie von 250 Joule bei einer mittleren Leistung von 2,5 kW abgeben.

Kontakt:

INGENERIC GmbH
Christina Ferwer
Dennewartstraße 25-27
52068 Aachen
Tel. +49.241.963-3951
Fax +49.241.963-1349
www.ingeneric.com
ferwer@ingeneric.com

Ansprechpartner für die Presse:

VIP Kommunikation
Dr.-Ing. Uwe Stein
Dennewartstraße 25-27
52068 Aachen
Tel.: +49.241.89468-55
Fax: +49.241.89468-44
www.vip-kommunikation.de
stein@vip-kommunikation.de

Bild 1:     Das neue monolithische Zylinderlinsen-Array „C-SMDB“ von INGENERIC für Single-Mode-Barren erzielt eine besonders hohe Güte der Kollimation.

Dateiname:
INGENERIC_C-SMDB1.jpg

Bild 2:     Das Array wirkt doppelseitig: Die Eintrittsseite kollimiert die Slow-Axis, die Austrittsseite die Fast-Axis des emittierten Lichtes.

Dateiname:
INGENERIC_C-SMDB2.jpg

Bild 3:     Auf dem neuen Array befinden sich 200 Linsenelemente im Abstand von 48 µm.

Dateiname:
INGENERIC_C-SMDB3.jpg

 

read more

Aachen, Germany, December 19, 2017—At the “Photonics West 2018”, INGENERIC for the first time presents the new micro-optics module “C-SMDB”, developed by the company for the collimation of single-mode diode bars. This helps to exploit the improved brightness and open up new fields of application for laser manufacturers.

Single-mode bars can achieve high performances with their large numbers of single emitters. Also, the beam quality from single emitters is superior to that of broad stripe emitters, as each emitter gives off light in fundamental mode. To make best use of these advantages, an optical module needs to collimate the light beam separately for each emitter. The emitters are tightly packed, so it is necessary to use compact micro-optics with the finest structures. The new collimation module optimizes the utilization of the high performance available from single-mode diode bars, and this opens up potential new applications.

The new monolithic cylindrical lens array "C-SMDB" from INGENERIC for single-mode bars achieves high degrees of collimation as it is produced with the process of precision glass molding. The array is effectively double-sided: The entry side collimates the slow axis, the exit side the fast axis of the emitted light.

The production accuracy of the micro-optics is subject to considerably higher demands than is the case with the optics for diodes with broad stripe emitters. The pitch between the individual lens elements on the slow-axis side, for example, must be maintained with extreme accuracy: For 200 elements, the pitch has to be on average less than 5 nanometers. The center thickness should ideally be in the range of +/- two microns in order to achieve an optimal result.

INGENERIC uses the precision glass molding of the arrays to meet this challenge, a process which the company uses for other micro-optics in its product portfolio. With glass molding, high refractive-index glass very precisely takes on the shape of the pressing tool. The molds manufactured by INGENERIC to sub-micron precision enable the arrays to be produced with exceptionally high accuracy and reproducibility. INGENERIC successfully manufactures arrays with minimal transition zones, highest filling factors and minimal pitch errors, even in large batches.

Dr. Stefan Hambücker, Managing Partner of INGENERIC, sees great potential for diode lasers: “For the single-mode bars, we are currently working to demonstrate their functionality and cost-effectiveness in new fields of application. That is why, in terms of optics, we are working very closely with the manufacturers of diode lasers. With high fill factors, excellent utilization of the surface area, extremely high contour accuracy and a good orientation of the surfaces to one another, the C-SMDB is exactly the right product to make the best use of the brightness.”

The new array has a design wavelength of 970 nm. The effective focal length (EFL) of the fast-axis collimation (FAC) is 600 μm with a numerical aperture of 0.8, the EFL of the slow-axis collimation (SAC) is 190 μm, and the pitch of the SAC is 48 μm. There are 200 lens elements on each part. The result is a back focal length (BFL) of 179 microns.

beamPROP beam shaping optics

INGENERIC is also exhibiting the beamPROP 200 beam-shaping optics, a lens array that adjusts the beam parameter product (BPP) of the fast and slow axis of high-power diode lasers. It is a key component for fiber coupling of diode bars and for dense wavelength multiplexing (DWM).

What is new is that INGENERIC now produces arrays with pitches not only of 500 and 400 μm, but now also with a pitch of 200 μm. This allows the emitters on the bars to be placed closer together and provides an increase in the usable power, which is a necessary step to increase the efficiency in the application. As a result, the beamPROP 200 and the C-SMDB extend the spectrum of diode laser applications.

Christian Wessling, Head of Product Development at INGENERIC, sees the company as a trailblazer for new applications: “With regards to the DWM, which operates with the beamPROP, a number of manufacturers of diode bars continue to work on a comprehensive concept—and optics are a crucial component here. We are working with them step by step to develop this technology. We see ourselves as enablers who are helping to open up new applications.”

4.400 characters with spaces and header

INGENERIC at "SPIE Photonics West"
San Francisco/USA, Jan. 27 to Feb. 1, 2018:
Stand 5153

Background information on the industry trend

Diode lasers are characterized by their compact design, high efficiency, long service intervals, and long service life. Although the diode laser is already qualified for numerous applications, the achievable brightness is still subject to the structure of the component as the limiting factor. Also, beam quality today is still not sufficient for some applications, such as material processing.

Manufacturers of diode lasers are endeavoring to develop new fields of application for their products. Primary factors are the brightness and beam quality of the diode lasers. All current developments aim to improve these properties, for example to stabilize the wavelengths during multiplexing (DWM) and thus to combine higher powers with thinner fibers, or to make optimum use of the brightness of single-mode bars. Both approaches require special micro-optics for collimation and beam shaping. However, development work is still required in comparison to the established designs that rely on FAC, SAC, deflecting mirrors and coupling optics to bundle the power into a single fiber. The new micro-optics from INGENERIC have the potential to outperform the brightness of established approaches, which would open up new applications.

1,300 characters with spaces and header

About INGENERIC

Founded in 2001 in the university-city of Aachen, Germany, INGENERIC GmbH develops and manufactures high-precision micro-optic components for high-power applications, along with optical and laser systems including fiber couplers, homogenizers and collimation modules for science, medicine and measurement technology.

Today, INGENERIC is one of the few manufacturers in Europe to develop and manufacture glass micro-optics for beam shaping in semiconductor diode lasers according to the individual specifications of its international customers. The company handles the entire process chain from the lens design and the development of prototypes through to the small-batch production and serial manufacture.

INGENERIC also produces high-power laser systems. For the HiLASE or XFEL project, for example, INGENERIC supplied a number of high-energy lasers delivering 10 pulses per second with an energy of 250 Joules and an average power output of 2.5kW.

Contact:

INGENERIC GmbH
Christina Ferwer
Dennewartstraße 25-27
52068 Aachen, Germany
Tel. +49.241.963-3951
Fax +49.241.963-1349
www.ingeneric.com
ferwer@ingeneric.com

Press contact:

VIP Kommunikation
Dr.-Ing. Uwe Stein
Dennewartstraße 25-27
52068 Aachen, Germany
Tel.: +49.241.89468-55
Fax: +49.241.89468-44
www.vip-kommunikation.de
stein@vip-kommunikation.de

Image 1:  The new monolithic cylindrical lens array "C-SMDB" from INGENERIC for single-mode bars achieves high degrees of collimation.

File name:
INGENERIC_C-SMDB.jpg

Image 2:  The array is effectively double-sided: The entry side collimates the slow axis, the exit side the fast axis of the emitted light.

File name:
INGENERIC C-SMDB2.jpg

Image 3:  The new array contains 200 lens elements spaced 48μm apart.

File name:
INGENERIC C-SMDB3.jpg

 

Photo Credits: INGENERIC

 

Neue Mikrolinsen-Arrays bieten große Vorteile in optischen Anwendungen

New INGENERIC microlens arrays offer significant advantages in optical applications

Mikrooptiken für Strahlformung, Kollimation und Homogenisierung |Micro-optics for beam shaping, collimation, and homogenization

Blankpressen von hoch brechendem Glas ermöglicht höchste Präzision| Highest precision molding of high refractive index glass

weiterlesen

Aachen, 6. Juni 2017    Erstmals stellt INGENERIC auf der diesjährigen „Laser – World of Photonics“ die neuen Mikrolinsen-Arrays aus Glas mit hohem Brechungsindex vor. Sie werden nach dem Präzisions-Blankpressverfahren hergestellt und zeichnen sich durch hohe Formgenauigkeit aus. INGENERIC entwickelt individuelle Arrays für Kunden und führt sie in die wirtschaftliche Serienproduktion über.

Auf der Messe präsentiert das Unternehmen aus der Technologieregion Aachen seine neuen Mikrolinsen-Arrays mit bis zu 500 einzelnen Linsen und Abmessungen von bis zu 60 x 60 mm, zum Beispiel für die Strahlformung und das Homogenisieren von Licht.

INGENERIC wendet das Präzisions-Blankpressen an, bei dem hoch brechendes Glas exakt die Form des Presswerkzeugs annimmt. Da das Unternehmen die Formen mit Submikron-Präzision fertigt, erzielt es bei der Produktion der Arrays außergewöhnlich hohe Genauigkeit und Reproduzierbarkeit. So gelingt es INGENERIC, Arrays mit minimalen Übergangszonen, höchsten Füllfaktoren und kleinsten Pitch-Fehlern prozesssicher auch in Großserien herzustellen.

Beim Entwurf von Mikrooptiken für spezielle Anwendungen bietet das Verfahren darüber hinaus große Freiheit: Im Vergleich mit dem Ätzverfahren können komplexere Optiken mit größerem Aspektverhältnis von Radius und Apertur realisiert werden. Darüber hinaus zeichnet sich das Verfahren durch eine relative Radiustoleranz von besser als 0,2 Prozent aus, die bei der Serienproduktion genau reproduzierbar ist.

Dr.-Ing. Stefan Hambücker, einer der Geschäftsführer von INGENERIC, sieht deutliche Vorteile für seine Kunden: „Mit den neuen Mikrolinsen-Arrays aus hoch brechendem Glas, die wir als einer der ganz wenigen europäischen Hersteller entwickeln und fertigen, eröffnen wir unseren Kunden nicht nur neue Märkte. Sie können auch bestehende Systeme verbessern. So steigern sie die Qualität ihrer Produkte und erfüllen gleichzeitig die Kostenanforderungen der Serienfertigung.“

INGENERIC stellt Mikrolinsen-Arrays mit asphärischen oder sphärischen Linsen her, die plankonvex, bikonvex oder konvex-konkav sind sowie eine runde oder rechteckige Apertur mit Durchmessern von 0,2 bis 3,0 mm aufweisen. Sie können Abmessungen von bis zu 60 × 60 mm haben.

Strahlformungsoptik beamPROP

Außerdem zeigt INGENERIC neben seinem Standardportfolio auf der Messe die neue Strahlformungsoptik beamPROP 200. Sie ist eine der Schlüsselkomponenten für das Einkoppeln des Laserlichts aus Barren in Fasern sowie für die dichte Wellenlängenkopplung. Neu ist, dass INGENERIC den Pitch von bisher 500 und 400 auf jetzt zusätzlich 200 µm reduziert und somit sein Geometrie-Spektrum für die Anwendung mit weiteren Laserbarren erweitert hat.

Mit dem beamPROP von INGENERIC erzielen die Kunden deutlich bessere und reproduzierbarere Resultate als mit Komponenten aus anderen Herstellungsverfahren. So nutzt INGENERIC für die Herstellung des neuen beamPROPs nicht nur die Expertise seiner erprobten Fertigungstechnologie, sondern es kommt hier außerdem eine präzise, automatisierte Montagetechnik zum Tragen.

Die Vorteile der Strahlformungsoptiken von INGENERIC gegenüber anderen Herstellungsverfahren sind unter anderem:

  • Optimale Nutzung der Apertur durch kleinste Übergangszonen und besonders hohe Füllfaktoren
  • Minimale Aberration aufgrund der Fertigungsgenauigkeit
  • Präzise Drehung des Strahls dank der hohen Genauigkeit der Mittendicke der Linsen von +/- 6 µm
  • Minimale Pointing-Fehler mittels der präzisen Position der Vorder- und Rückseite der Linsen

INGENERIC auf der „Laser – World of Photonics“
München, 26. bis 29. Juni 2017:
Halle B1, Stand 430

Hintergrund: Die Präzision im Detail

Die Array-Strukturen bewegen sich typisch im Sub-Millimeterbereich, die Formgenauigkeit liegt mit weniger als 250 nm im Submikron-Bereich. Dies macht es möglich, Arrays mit hohen Füllfaktoren herzustellen und die optisch wirksame Fläche optimal auszunutzen: Übergangszonen von weniger als 10 μm realisiert INGENERIC mit hoher Prozesssicherheit. Der Nutzen für den Anwender: Optimale Strahlformung und hohe Effizienz bei Übertragung und Kopplung.

Das Blankpressen gestattet es außerdem, bei beidseitigen Optiken den Versatz zwischen Ober- und Unterseite des Arrays auf weniger als 5 μm genau einzuhalten. Hinzu kommt eine sehr hohe Pitch-Genauigkeit: Den Abstand der einzelnen Linsenmittelpunkte reproduziert INGENERIC mit einer Genauigkeit von besser als 2 µm auf 25 mm Länge, so kumulieren Fehler nicht über die Breite des Arrays.

Für einige Mikrooptiken – besonders für beidseitige Strukturen – ist das genaue Einhalten der Mittendicke sehr wichtig, da sie teleskopisch wirken und kleinste Abweichungen zu Abbildungsfehlern führen. Hier erzielt INGENERIC Genauigkeiten von etwa +/-6 µm.

Im Vergleich mit klassischen Verfahren – beispielsweise dem Quarzätzen – realisiert INGENERIC eine relative Radiustoleranz von besser als 0,2 Prozent, die bei der Serienproduktion von Wafer zu Wafer exakt reproduziert wird.

 

Über INGENERIC

Die 2001 am Technologie- und Forschungsstandort Aachen gegründete INGENERIC GmbH entwickelt und produziert hochpräzise mikrooptische Komponenten für High-Power-Applikationen sowie optische Systeme und Lasersysteme wie Faserkoppler, Homogenisierer und Kollimations-Module für Wissenschaft, Medizin und Messtechnik.

Heute ist INGENERIC einer der wenigen Hersteller in Europa, der Mikrooptiken aus Glas für die Strahlformung in Halbleiter-Diodenlasern nach den individuellen Vorgaben seiner internationalen Kunden entwickelt und produziert. Dabei deckt das Unternehmen die gesamte Prozesskette vom Design der Linsen und der Entwicklung von Prototypen über die Kleinserie bis hin zur Serienfertigung ab.

Außerdem stellt INGENERIC Hochleistungs-Lasersysteme her. Für das HiLASE Projekt zum Beispiel hat INGENERIC bereits mehrere Hochenergie-Laser geliefert, die pro Sekunde 10 Pulse mit einer Energie von 100 Joule bei einer Leistung von 1kW abgeben.

Kontakt:

INGENERIC GmbH
Christina Ferwer
Dennewartstraße 25-27
52068 Aachen
Tel. +49.241.963-3951
Fax +49.241.963-1349
www.ingeneric.com
ferwer@ingeneric.com

Ansprechpartner für die Presse:

VIP Kommunikation
Dr.-Ing. Uwe Stein
Dennewartstraße 25-27
52068 Aachen
Tel.:  +49.241.89468-55
Fax:  +49.241.89468-44
www.vip-kommunikation.de
stein@vip-kommunikation.de

read more

Aachen, Germany, June 6, 2017 - INGENERIC premiers their new microlens arrays with high refractive index glass at this year's “Laser - World of Photonics”. Manufactured in a precision glass molding process, they are characterized by high dimensional accuracy. INGENERIC develops customized arrays and brings them to commercial serial production.

At the trade fair, the company based in Aachen, Germany is presenting its new microlens arrays with up to 500 individual lenses and dimensions of up to 60 x 60 mm, for example for beam shaping and light homogenization.

INGENERIC works with precision molding techniques, which ensure that high refractive index glass takes on precisely the form of the molding tool. The molds manufactured by the company to sub-micron precision enable the arrays to be produced with exceptionally high accuracy and reproducibility. INGENERIC successfully manufactures arrays with minimal transition zones, highest filling factors and minimal pitch errors, even in large batches.

When it comes to designing micro-optics for special applications, the process offers significant degrees of freedom: Compared to the etching process, optics can be far more complex with a larger radius-to-aperture aspect ratio. Furthermore, the process excels with a relative radius tolerance better than 0.2 %, which is fully reproducible in serial production.

Dr. Stefan Hambücker, a Managing Director at INGENERIC, sees clear advantages for his customers: “As one of the very few European manufacturers involved in the development and manufacture of the new microlens arrays with high-refraction glass, we are not only opening up new markets to our customers. We also help them to improve their existing systems. They can improve the quality of their products while at the same time they meet the cost requirements of serial production.”

INGENERIC manufactures microlens arrays with aspherical or spherical lenses that are planoconvex, biconvex or convex-concave, and which have a circular or rectangular aperture measuring from 0.2 to 3.0 mm. They can have dimensions of up to 60 × 60 mm.

Beam-shaping lens beamPROP

Along with its standard portfolio, INGENERIC is also exhibiting its new beam-shaping optic beamPROP 200 at the fair. It is a key component for fiber coupling the laser light from diode bars and for dense wavelength beam combining. INGENERIC has now reduced the pitch from 500 and 400 to 200 μm, which expands its geometry spectrum for use with additional laser bars.

The beamPROP from INGENERIC enables customers to achieve significantly better and more reproducible results than with components manufactured in other ways. INGENERIC can leverage the expertise from its tried-and-tested production technologies for the manufacture of the new beamPROP; a precise and automated assembly technology is applied here.

The advantages of INGENERIC beam-shaping optics over other manufacturing processes include:

  • Optimal use of the aperture due to the smallest possible transition zones and particularly high filling factors
  • Minimal aberration due to manufacturing accuracy
  • Precise beam rotation thanks to the high accuracy of the lens center thickness of +/- 6μm
  • Minimal pointing errors due to the precise alignment of the front and back of the lenses

INGENERIC at the “Laser – World of Photonics” in Munich,
June 26 – 29, 2017:
Hall B1, Booth 430

Background: Precision in detail

The array structures typically have dimensions in the sub-millimeter range, and the dimensional accuracy is sub-micron at less than 250 nm. This makes it possible to produce arrays with high filling factors and to make the best possible use of the optically effective surface area: INGENERIC reliably implements transition zones of less than 10 μm. The benefit to the user: Optimal beam shaping and high-efficiency transmission and coupling.

High-precision molding keeps the offset between the upper and lower sides of the array under 5 μm. In addition, there is very high pitch accuracy: INGENERIC reproduces the separation between the individual lens center points with an accuracy of better than 2 μm over a length of 25 mm, so there is no accumulation of errors across the width of the array.

For some micro-optics – particularly the two-sided structures – the exact adherence to the central thickness is vitally important, since they have a telescopic effect and the slightest deviations lead to aberrations. INGENERIC achieves accuracies close to +/-6 μm here.

Compared to conventional methods like fused silica etching, INGENERIC achieves a relative radius tolerance better than 0.2 percent, which in serial production is precisely reproducible from wafer to wafer.

 

About INGENERIC

Founded in 2001 in the university-city of Aachen, Germany, INGENERIC GmbH develops and manufactures high-precision micro-optic components for high-power applications, along with optical and laser systems including fiber couplers, homogenizers and collimation modules for science, medicine, and measurement technology.

Today, INGENERIC is one of the few manufacturers in Europe to develop and manufacture glass micro-optics for beam shaping in semiconductor diode lasers according to the individual specifications of its international customers. The company handles the entire process chain from the lens design and the development of prototypes through to the small-batch production and serial manufacture.

INGENERIC also produces high-power laser systems. For the HiLASE project, for example, INGENERIC supplied a number of high-energy lasers delivering 10 pulses per second with an energy of 100 Joules and a power output of 1kW.

Contact:

INGENERIC GmbH
Christina Ferwer
Dennewartstraße 25-27
52068 Aachen, Germany
Tel. +49.241.963-3951
Fax +49.241.963-1349
www.ingeneric.com
ferwer@ingeneric.com

Press contact:

VIP Kommunikation
Dr.-Ing. Uwe Stein
Dennewartstraße 25-27
52068 Aachen, Germany
Tel.:  +49.241.89468-55
Fax:  +49.241.89468-44
www.vip-kommunikation.de
stein@vip-kommunikation.de